Online learning tool assists students to efficiently master kanji ‹ Japan Today: Japan News and Discussion

A practical list to print out and keep on hand for learning kanji.

A practical list to print out and keep on hand for learning kanji.

Has your journey of learning Japanese felt like this or different?

Has your journey of learning Japanese felt like this or different?

Who loves kanji like you?

Check out this infographic to discover the many fans of our Facebook page who share your passion and is your extended kanji family!

For a larger version, click here - http://www.slideshare.net/readthekanji/read-the-kanji

Who loves kanji like you?

Check out this infographic to discover the many fans of our Facebook page who share your passion and is your extended kanji family!

For a larger version, click here - http://www.slideshare.net/readthekanji/read-the-kanji

Show your love for kanji! 

Visit our online store to get the latest designs.

http://www.zazzle.com/readthekanji

Have a suggestion for a t-shirt? Shoot us a message on our Facebook page!

Show your love for kanji!

Visit our online store to get the latest designs.

http://www.zazzle.com/readthekanji

Have a suggestion for a t-shirt? Shoot us a message on our Facebook page!

The Japanese are a very expressive people when it comes to being online. While emoticons are well-known all over the world — such as :) — the Japanese utilize a vast selection of symbols to represent feelings that puts the rest of the planet to shame. These represent just a tiny, tiny sample of some of those emoticons.

Do you have a favorite emoticon?

The Japanese are a very expressive people when it comes to being online. While emoticons are well-known all over the world — such as :) — the Japanese utilize a vast selection of symbols to represent feelings that puts the rest of the planet to shame. These represent just a tiny, tiny sample of some of those emoticons.

Do you have a favorite emoticon?

Have you practiced your kanji today?

www.readthekanji.com

Have you practiced your kanji today?

www.readthekanji.com

It’s Tanabata Time!

Tanabata, also known as the “star festival,” takes place on the 7th day of the 7th month of the year, when, according to a Chinese legend, the two stars Altair and Vega, which are usually separated from each other by the milky way, are able to meet.

Because the 7th month of the year roughly coincides with August rather than July according to the formerly used lunar calendar, Tanabata is still celebrated on August 7th in some regions of Japan, while it is celebrated on July 7th in other regions.

Colorful Tanabata festivals are held across Japan in early July and August. Among the biggest and most famous ones are the Tanabata Festivals of Sendaiin August and Hiratsuka near Tokyo in July.

One popular Tanabata custom is to write one’s wishes on a piece of paper and then hang that piece of paper on a specially erected bamboo tree in the hope that the wishes become true.

Use the image below to help your wishes come true!

It’s Tanabata Time!

Tanabata, also known as the “star festival,” takes place on the 7th day of the 7th month of the year, when, according to a Chinese legend, the two stars Altair and Vega, which are usually separated from each other by the milky way, are able to meet.

Because the 7th month of the year roughly coincides with August rather than July according to the formerly used lunar calendar, Tanabata is still celebrated on August 7th in some regions of Japan, while it is celebrated on July 7th in other regions.

Colorful Tanabata festivals are held across Japan in early July and August. Among the biggest and most famous ones are the Tanabata Festivals of Sendaiin August and Hiratsuka near Tokyo in July.

One popular Tanabata custom is to write one’s wishes on a piece of paper and then hang that piece of paper on a specially erected bamboo tree in the hope that the wishes become true.

Use the image below to help your wishes come true!